Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSilva-Batista, Carla
dc.contributor.authorCorcos, Daniel M.
dc.contributor.authorKanegusuku, Helcio
dc.contributor.authorPimentel Piemonte, Maria Elisa
dc.contributor.authorBucken Gobbi, Lilian Teresa [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorLima-Pardini, Andrea C. de
dc.contributor.authorMello, Marco Tulio de
dc.contributor.authorForjaz, Claudia L. M.
dc.contributor.authorUgrinowitsch, Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T09:28:15Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T09:28:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-01
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.12.027
dc.identifier.citationGait & Posture. Clare: Elsevier Ireland Ltd, v. 61, p. 90-97, 2018.
dc.identifier.issn0966-6362
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/166058
dc.description.abstractResistance training with instability (RTI) uses exercises with high motor complexity that impose high postural control and cognitive demands that may be important for improving postural instability and fear of falling in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we hypothesized that: 1) RTI will be more effective than resistance training (RT) in improving balance (Balance Evaluation Systems Test [BESTest] and overall stability index [Biodex Balance System (R)]) and fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International [FES-I] score) of subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD); and 2) changes in BESTest and FES-I after RTI will be associated with changes in cognitive function (Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA] score -previously published) induced by RTI. Thirty-nine subjects with moderate PD were randomly assigned to a nonexercising control, RT, and RTI groups. While RT and RTI groups performed progressive RT twice a week for 12 weeks, the RTI group added progressive unstable devices to increase motor complexity of the resistance exercises. There were significant group x time interactions for BESTest, overall stability index, and FES-I scores (P < 0.05). Only RTI improved BESTest, overall stability index and FES-I scores, and RTI was more effective than RT in improving biomechanical constraints and stability in gait (BESTest sections) at post-training (P < 0.05). There were strong correlations between relative changes in BESTest and MoCA (r= 0.72, P= 0.005), and FES-I and MoCA (r=-0.75, P= 0.003) after RTI. Due to the increased motor complexity in RTI, RTI is recommended for improving balance and fear of falling, which are associated with improvement in cognitive function of PD.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)
dc.description.sponsorshipCoordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES)
dc.description.sponsorshipConselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)
dc.format.extent90-97
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.relation.ispartofGait & Posture
dc.sourceWeb of Science
dc.subjectResistance training
dc.subjectUnstable device
dc.subjectPostural instability
dc.subjectFall
dc.subjectCognitive impairment
dc.subjectMuscle strength
dc.titleBalance and fear of falling in subjects with Parkinson's disease is improved after exercises with motor complexityen
dc.typeArtigo
dcterms.licensehttp://www.elsevier.com/about/open-access/open-access-policies/article-posting-policy
dcterms.rightsHolderElsevier B.V.
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)
dc.contributor.institutionNorthwestern Univ
dc.contributor.institutionRush Univ
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Lab Neuromuscular Adaptat Strength Training, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo, Sch Arts Sci & Humanities, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationNorthwestern Univ, Dept Phys Therapy & Human Movement Sci, Chicago, IL 60611 USA
dc.description.affiliationRush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Exercise Hemodynam Lab, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo, Fac Med Sci, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationSao Paulo State Univ Rio Claro, Posture & Gait Studies Lab, Rio Claro, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Human Motor Syst Lab, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo, Dept Radiol, LIM 44, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Ctr Psychobiol & Exercise Studies, Dept Psychobiol, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnespSao Paulo State Univ Rio Claro, Posture & Gait Studies Lab, Rio Claro, Brazil
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.12.027
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000428028400013
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso aberto
dc.description.sponsorshipIdFAPESP: 2011/042423
dc.description.sponsorshipIdFAPESP: 2012/03056-4
dc.description.sponsorshipIdFAPESP: 2013/04970-4
dc.description.sponsorshipIdCAPES: 3095/2015-00
dc.description.sponsorshipIdCNPq: 406609/2015-2
dc.identifier.fileWOS000428028400013.pdf
Localize o texto completo

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record