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dc.contributor.authorde Aquino, Monally Conceição Costa
dc.contributor.authorInácio, Sandra Valéria [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorRodrigues, Fernando de Souza
dc.contributor.authorde Barros, Luiz Daniel
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, João Luis
dc.contributor.authorHeadley, Selwyn Arlington
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Jancarlo Ferreira
dc.contributor.authorBresciani, Katia Denise Saraiva [UNESP]
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-25T11:06:51Z
dc.date.available2021-06-25T11:06:51Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-28
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2020.557967
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Veterinary Science, v. 7.
dc.identifier.issn2297-1769
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/208126
dc.description.abstractCryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis infect the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Both parasite groups are distributed worldwide and cause significant economic losses in animal productivity. Infected hosts presenting with and without clinical manifestations can eliminate infective forms of these protozoa, which are particularly important to One Health. Compared to the published research on cattle, relatively few studies have examined the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis in buffaloes. This short review describes the global occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis in buffaloes, including the molecular techniques employed for the identification of species/assemblages and genotypes of these protozoa. Genetic analyses of isolates of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. from various sources (environmental, animal, and human) have been performed to investigate their epidemiology. In buffaloes, the species Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium ryanae, Cryptosporidium bovis, and Cryptosporidium suis-like have been characterized, as well as assemblages A and E of G. duodenalis. We demonstrate that buffaloes can be infected by species of Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis assemblages with zoonotic potential. Epidemiological studies that utilize molecular biology techniques represent an important resource for efforts to control and prevent the spread of these protozoans.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Veterinary Science
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectassemblages
dc.subjectCryptosporidium
dc.subjectgenotypes
dc.subjectGiardia
dc.subjectwater buffalo
dc.subjectzoonosis
dc.titleCryptosporidiosis and Giardiasis in Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis)en
dc.typeResenha
dc.contributor.institutionEstácio de Sá University
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Minnesota
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP)
dc.description.affiliationEstácio de Sá University
dc.description.affiliationSchool of Veterinary Medicine Araçatuba São Paulo State University (UNESP)
dc.description.affiliationLaboratory of Animal Protozoology Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine State University of Londrina
dc.description.affiliationComparative Pathology Shared Resources Laboratory Masonic Cancer Center University of Minnesota
dc.description.affiliationLaboratory of Animal Pathology Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine State University of Londrina
dc.description.affiliationSchool of Medical Sciences University of Campinas
dc.description.affiliationLaboratory of Image Data Science Institute of Computing University of Campinas
dc.description.affiliationUnespSchool of Veterinary Medicine Araçatuba São Paulo State University (UNESP)
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fvets.2020.557967
dc.description.sponsorshipIdFAPESP: 2011/525423
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85095835993
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