Effects of peanut cultivars and neem oil on the feeding preference, growth and mortality of fall armyworm and velvet bean caterpillar (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

dc.contributor.authorCosta, Eduardo Neves [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorde Souza, Bruno Henrique Sardinha
dc.contributor.authorEduardo, Wellington Ivo [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorde Moraes, Renato Franco Oliveira [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorRibeiro, Zulene Antonio [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorJúnior, Arlindo Leal Boiça [UNESP]
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Federal da Grande Dourados
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA)
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-28T19:51:56Z
dc.date.available2022-04-28T19:51:56Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-01
dc.description.abstractThe fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda and the velvet bean caterpillar (VBC), Anticarsia gemmatalis are pests that can cause severe defoliation of peanut plants during any development stage throughout the Americas. This study aimed to evaluate effects of a bioinsecticide, neem oil, and two peanut cultivars on feeding preference, period of development, and mortality of FAW and VBC. Furthermore, wax content was estimated to correlate with peanut resistance. In the laboratory, feeding preference was tested under choice and no-choice assays. First and third instar larvae were released into Petri dishes containing leaves from the cultivars IAC Runner 886 or IAC Caiapó, with or without the application of either 0.15% or 0.30% neem oil. Considering the peanut cultivars, IAC Runner 886 was the least consumed by FAW third-instar larvae, in choice and no-choice tests. Similarly, the cultivar IAC Caiapó was the least consumed by VBC third instar larvae in no-choice test. When neem oil was added to these cultivars, FAW first-instar larvae exhibited feeding deterrence behaviors, whereas third-instar larvae also were deterred by neem oil but in only the free-choice assay. The first instar VBC larvae exhibited feeding deterrence to neem oil in the no-choice assay only. Overall, no larvae subjected to neem oil application completed the larval cycle. This study showed that certain peanut cultivars and neem oil are indeed promising options for managing FAW and VBC and opens the door to further study these options in the field. The relationship between wax content with peanut resistance is discussed.en
dc.description.affiliationFaculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias Departamento de Ciências da Produção Agrícola Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus de Jaboticabal, SP
dc.description.affiliationFaculdade de Ciências Agrárias Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, MS
dc.description.affiliationDepartamento de Entomologia Universidade Federal de Lavras, MG
dc.description.affiliationUnespFaculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias Departamento de Ciências da Produção Agrícola Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus de Jaboticabal, SP
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12600-022-00995-3
dc.identifier.citationPhytoparasitica.
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12600-022-00995-3
dc.identifier.issn1876-7184
dc.identifier.issn0334-2123
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85126352267
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/223643
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPhytoparasitica
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectAnticarsia gemmatalis
dc.subjectArachis hypogaea L
dc.subjectAzadirachta indica A. Juss
dc.subjectBotanical insecticides
dc.subjectIntegrated pest management
dc.subjectSpodoptera frugiperda
dc.titleEffects of peanut cultivars and neem oil on the feeding preference, growth and mortality of fall armyworm and velvet bean caterpillar (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)en
dc.typeArtigo
unesp.author.orcid0000-0001-9837-9570[1]

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