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dc.contributor.authorDe Grande, Fernando Rafael [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorCannicci, Stefano
dc.contributor.authorCosta, Tânia Marcia [UNESP]
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-11T17:22:15Z
dc.date.available2018-12-11T17:22:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03949370.2018.1503196
dc.identifier.citationEthology Ecology and Evolution.
dc.identifier.issn1828-7131
dc.identifier.issn0394-9370
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/176733
dc.description.abstractFiddler crabs are intertidal organisms well known to be highly adapted to low tide activity, thus a number of researches have studied their physiological, behavioral and sensory adaptations to such a tidal phase. However, recent evidences showed that some fiddler crabs are the main food item of fish, suggesting that they could also be active underwater. Based on these preliminary observations, we designed laboratory trials aimed to investigate the ability to detect underwater predators in Leptuca thayeri, across sexes and life stages. We tested a combination of chemical and visual cues, using the predator fish Sphoeroides greeleyi, and, as a control, the non-predator fish Mugil curema. Leptuca thayeri detected the presence of chemical cues coming from the predator fish, although significant differences between adults and juveniles were observed. Adults of L. thayeri remained within their burrows and avoided predator exposition, while juveniles were bold and even increased their activity on the sediment surface. We suggest that juvenile crabs’ boldness could be explained by a predator inspection behavior, which allows them to gather information about the possible risk of different predatory species, while experienced adults reduce predation risk recognizing the predator itself.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEthology Ecology and Evolution
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectaquatic predator
dc.subjectchemical cues
dc.subjectpredator inspection
dc.subjectSphoeroides greeleyi
dc.subjectunderwater activity
dc.titleCan fiddler crabs detect underwater predators? A laboratory test with Leptuca thayerien
dc.typeArtigo
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Hong Kong
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Florence
dc.description.affiliationPostgraduate Program in Biological Sciences (Zoology) Botucatu Biosciences Institute São Paulo State University–UNESP
dc.description.affiliationThe Swire Institute of Marine Science and School of Biological Sciences University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Biology University of Florence, Via Madonna del Piano 6
dc.description.affiliationLaboratory of Ecology and Animal Behavior Coastal Campus Biosciences Institute São Paulo State University–UNESP
dc.description.affiliationUnespPostgraduate Program in Biological Sciences (Zoology) Botucatu Biosciences Institute São Paulo State University–UNESP
dc.description.affiliationUnespLaboratory of Ecology and Animal Behavior Coastal Campus Biosciences Institute São Paulo State University–UNESP
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03949370.2018.1503196
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso aberto
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85051930698
dc.identifier.file2-s2.0-85051930698.pdf
dc.relation.ispartofsjr0,648
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