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dc.contributor.authorGuzzi, Anderson
dc.contributor.authorDuarte Branco, Mario Sergio
dc.contributor.authorDonatelli, Reginaldo Jose [UNESP]
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-26T17:06:13Z
dc.date.available2018-11-26T17:06:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-01
dc.identifier.citationRevista De Biologia Tropical. San Jose: Revista De Biologia Tropical, v. 64, n. 3, p. 1155-1170, 2016.
dc.identifier.issn0034-7744
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/161928
dc.description.abstractThe Furnariidae encompasses 293 species and has been recognized as an example of continental adaptive radiation. They inhabit biomes from deserts to humid forests at all strata and show morphological heterogeneity unparalleled among birds at any taxonomic level. Sclerurus is a uniform genus of cryptic, mainly dark brown furnariids, with short black tails which are found solitary on or near the ground inside humid forest. The aim of the present study was to describe and to compare the cranial osteology of all six Sclerurus species (S. scansor, S. mexicanus, S. guatemalensis, S. caudacutus, S. rufigularis, and S. albigularis) to identify osteological characters that are (1) unique to each species, (2) shared among species, and (3) that are exclusive to the genus when compared to other members of Furnariidae. For this, bone structures and measurements were done following standard methodologies. The results showed that Sclerurus differs from other Furnariidae in the following characteristics: a narrowed caudal portion of the nostril with a more rounded shape allowing upper's jaw greater mobility, used when foraging on soft substrates; the development of the post-orbital process may be related to digging behavior, as the presence of a short parsphenoid rostrum projection, a reduced cerebellar prominence, and the tapered caudal portion of the nostrils. Among the species, the interorbital width is larger in S. caudacutus and S. rufigularis, than in the remaining species. The development of the post-orbital process may be related to the behavior of digging nests in earthen banks; the narrowing of the caudal portion of the nostril allows for the greater mobility of the superior maxilla, which is used by Sclerurus when foraging in soft substrates on forest grounds.en
dc.format.extent1155-1170
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRevista De Biologia Tropical
dc.relation.ispartofRevista De Biologia Tropical
dc.sourceWeb of Science
dc.subjectOvenbirds
dc.subjectScleruridae
dc.subjectanatomy
dc.subjectsystematic
dc.titleCranial osteology of the genus Sclerurus (Passeriformes: Furnariidae)en
dc.typeArtigo
dcterms.rightsHolderRevista De Biologia Tropical
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Fed Piaui
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Piaui, Dept Ciencias Mar, BR-64202020 Parnaiba, Piaui, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Estadual Paulista, Dept Ciencias Biol, BR-17001970 Bauru, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnespUniv Estadual Paulista, Dept Ciencias Biol, BR-17001970 Bauru, SP, Brazil
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000383467900019
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso aberto
dc.identifier.fileWOS000383467900019.pdf
dc.relation.ispartofsjr0,326
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