The dimensionality of ecological networks

dc.contributor.authorEklöf, Anna
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Ute
dc.contributor.authorKopp, Jason
dc.contributor.authorBosch, Jordi
dc.contributor.authorCastro-Urgal, Rocío
dc.contributor.authorChacoff, Natacha P.
dc.contributor.authorDalsgaard, Bo
dc.contributor.authorde Sassi, Claudio
dc.contributor.authorGaletti, Mauro [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorGuimarães, Paulo R.
dc.contributor.authorLomáscolo, Silvia Beatriz
dc.contributor.authorMartín González, Ana M.
dc.contributor.authorPizo, Marco Aurelio [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorRader, Romina
dc.contributor.authorRodrigo, Anselm
dc.contributor.authorTylianakis, Jason M.
dc.contributor.authorVázquez, Diego P.
dc.contributor.authorAllesina, Stefano
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Chicago
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries Science
dc.contributor.institutionUniversitat Autónoma de Barcelona
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut Mediterrani d'Estudis Avançats (CSIC-UIB)
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto Argentino de Investigaciones de las Zonas Áridas, CONICET
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Copenhagen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Canterbury
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidad Nacional de Cuyo
dc.contributor.institutionPacific Ecoinformatics and Computational Ecology Lab
dc.contributor.institutionStockholm University
dc.contributor.institutionLinköping University
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-27T11:29:02Z
dc.date.available2014-05-27T11:29:02Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-01
dc.description.abstractHow many dimensions (trait-axes) are required to predict whether two species interact? This unanswered question originated with the idea of ecological niches, and yet bears relevance today for understanding what determines network structure. Here, we analyse a set of 200 ecological networks, including food webs, antagonistic and mutualistic networks, and find that the number of dimensions needed to completely explain all interactions is small (< 10), with model selection favouring less than five. Using 18 high-quality webs including several species traits, we identify which traits contribute the most to explaining network structure. We show that accounting for a few traits dramatically improves our understanding of the structure of ecological networks. Matching traits for resources and consumers, for example, fruit size and bill gape, are the most successful combinations. These results link ecologically important species attributes to large-scale community structure. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.en
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Ecology and Evolution University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
dc.description.affiliationInstitute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries Science, Hamburg
dc.description.affiliationCREAF - Ecology Unit Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona
dc.description.affiliationInstitut Mediterrani d'Estudis Avançats (CSIC-UIB), Mallorca, Balearic Islands
dc.description.affiliationInstituto Argentino de Investigaciones de las Zonas Áridas, CONICET, Mendoza
dc.description.affiliationCenter for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate Department of Biology University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen
dc.description.affiliationSchool of Biological Sciences University of Canterbury, Canterbury
dc.description.affiliationDepartamento de Ecologia Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro
dc.description.affiliationDepartamento de Ecologia I.B, Universidade de São Paulo, Sao Paulo
dc.description.affiliationInstituto de Ciencias Básicas Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza
dc.description.affiliationPacific Ecoinformatics and Computational Ecology Lab, Berkeley, CA
dc.description.affiliationDepartamento de Zoologia Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology Stockholm University, Stockholm
dc.description.affiliationComputation Institute University of Chicago, Chicago
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Physics, chemistry and biology Linköping University, Linköping, SE-581 83
dc.description.affiliationUnespDepartamento de Ecologia Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro
dc.description.affiliationUnespDepartamento de Zoologia Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo
dc.format.extent577-583
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ele.12081
dc.identifier.citationEcology Letters, v. 16, n. 5, p. 577-583, 2013.
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ele.12081
dc.identifier.issn1461-023X
dc.identifier.issn1461-0248
dc.identifier.lattes3431375174670630
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84876713348
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/75258
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000318077200002
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEcology Letters
dc.relation.ispartofjcr9.137
dc.relation.ispartofsjr6,825
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso restrito
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectEcological networks
dc.subjectFood web structure
dc.subjectIntervality
dc.subjectNiche space
dc.subjectScaling
dc.subjectSpecies traits
dc.subjectantagonism
dc.subjectcommunity structure
dc.subjectconsumer-resource interaction
dc.subjectecological modeling
dc.subjectfood web
dc.subjectinterspecific interaction
dc.subjectlife history trait
dc.subjectmutualism
dc.subjectnetwork design
dc.subjectniche
dc.subjectsocial network
dc.titleThe dimensionality of ecological networksen
dc.typeArtigo
dcterms.licensehttp://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-406071.html
unesp.author.lattes3431375174670630
unesp.author.orcid0000-0003-0313-8374[18]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0002-8088-9457[4]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0002-8187-8696[9]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0001-7402-5620[16]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0002-8811-7347[8]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0001-9429-7180[12]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0001-9056-9118[14]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0001-6341-0363[15]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0002-3449-5748[17]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0003-2867-2805[7]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0003-2721-0051[1]
unesp.campusUniversidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp), Instituto de Biociências, Rio Claropt

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