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dc.contributor.authorBarrow, Paul Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBerchieri, Angelo [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorFreitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano de
dc.contributor.authorLovell, Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-26T15:28:01Z
dc.date.available2018-11-26T15:28:01Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-03
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079457.2015.1062841
dc.identifier.citationAvian Pathology. Abingdon: Taylor & Francis Ltd, v. 44, n. 5, p. 401-407, 2015.
dc.identifier.issn0307-9457
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/158538
dc.description.abstractThe basic mechanism whereby Salmonella serovars colonize the chicken intestine remains poorly understood. Previous studies have indicated that proton-translocating proteins utilizing oxygen as terminal electron acceptor do not appear to be of major importance in the gut of the newly hatched chicken and consequently they would be even less significant during intestinal colonization of more mature chickens where the complex gut microflora would trap most of the oxygen in the lumen. Consequently, alternative electron acceptors may be more significant or, in their absence, substrate-level phosphorylation may also be important to Salmonella serovars in this environment. To investigate this we constructed mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium defective in various aspects of oxidative or substrate-level phosphorylation to assess their role in colonization of the chicken intestine, assessed through faecal shedding, and virulence. Mutations affecting use of oxygen or alternative electron acceptors did not eliminate faecal shedding. By contrast mutations in either pta (phosphotransacetylase) or ackA (acetate kinase) abolished shedding. The pta but not the ackA mutation also abolished systemic virulence for chickens. An additional ldhA (lactate dehydrogenase) mutant also showed poor colonizing ability. We hypothesise that substrate-level phosphorylation may be more important than respiration using oxygen or alternative electron acceptors for colonization of the chicken caeca.en
dc.description.sponsorshipConselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)
dc.description.sponsorshipFundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)
dc.description.sponsorshipBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of the Environment and Rural Affairs (Defra)
dc.format.extent401-407
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd
dc.relation.ispartofAvian Pathology
dc.sourceWeb of Science
dc.titleThe contribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiration to intestinal colonization and virulence for Salmonella typhimurium in the chickenen
dc.typeArtigo
dcterms.licensehttp://journalauthors.tandf.co.uk/permissions/reusingOwnWork.asp
dcterms.rightsHolderTaylor & Francis Ltd
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Nottingham
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp)
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Fed Paraiba
dc.description.affiliationUniv Nottingham, Sch Vet Med & Sci, Loughborough, Leics, England
dc.description.affiliationUniv Estadual Paulista, Fac Ciencias Agr & Vet, Dept Vet Pathol, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Paraiba, Dept Vet Sci, BR-58059900 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnespUniv Estadual Paulista, Fac Ciencias Agr & Vet, Dept Vet Pathol, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03079457.2015.1062841
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000362411400011
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso aberto
dc.identifier.fileWOS000362411400011.pdf
unesp.author.lattes3508096260678286[2]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0003-2522-6500[2]
dc.relation.ispartofsjr0,871
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