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dc.contributor.authorReimer, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorMaia, Caroline Marques
dc.contributor.authorSantos, Eliana Ferraz
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-26T17:55:53Z
dc.date.available2018-11-26T17:55:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888705.2016.1175944
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Applied Animal Welfare Science. Abingdon: Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd, v. 19, n. 4, p. 385-395, 2016.
dc.identifier.issn1088-8705
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/164737
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental enrichment has been widely used to improve conditions for nonhuman animals in captivity. However, there is no consensus about the best way to evaluate the success of enrichments. This study evaluated whether the proportion of time spent interacting with enrichments indicated the proportion of overall behavioral changes. Six environmental enrichments were introduced in succession to 16 captive macaws, and interaction of the animals with them as well as the behaviors of the group were recorded before and during the enrichments. All of the enrichments affected the proportions of time spent in different behaviors. Macaws interacted more with certain items (hibiscus and food tree) than with others (a toy or swings and stairs), but introduction of the enrichments that invoked the least interaction caused as many behavioral changes as those that invoked the most. Moreover, feeding behavior was only affected by the enrichment that invoked the least interaction, a change not detected by a general analysis of enrichment effects. In conclusion, little interaction with enrichment does not mean little change in behavior, and the effects of enrichments are more complex than previously considered.en
dc.format.extent385-395
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd
dc.relation.ispartofJournal Of Applied Animal Welfare Science
dc.sourceWeb of Science
dc.subjectEnrichment interaction
dc.subjectbehavior
dc.subjectcaptivity
dc.subjectenrichment items
dc.titleEnvironmental Enrichments for a Group of Captive Macaws: Low Interaction Does Not Mean Low Behavioral Changesen
dc.typeArtigo
dcterms.licensehttp://journalauthors.tandf.co.uk/permissions/reusingOwnWork.asp
dcterms.rightsHolderRoutledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)
dc.contributor.institutionBosque Jequitibas Zoo
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo State, Inst Biosci, Dept Zool, Botucatu, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo State, Inst Biosci, Dept Physiol, Lab Anim Physiol & Behav, Botucatu, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationBosque Jequitibas Zoo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10888705.2016.1175944
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000382302500006
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso aberto
dc.identifier.fileWOS000382302500006.pdf
dc.relation.ispartofsjr0,588
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