Seasonal variation in leaf traits between congeneric savanna and forest trees in Central Brazil: Implications for forest expansion into savanna

dc.contributor.authorRossatto, Davi Rodrigo [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, William Arthur
dc.contributor.authorde Carvalho Ramos Silva, Lucas
dc.contributor.authorHaridasan, Mundayatan
dc.contributor.authorSternberg, Leonel S.L.
dc.contributor.authorFranco, Augusto César
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp)
dc.contributor.institutionNorth Carolina State University
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of California Davis
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade de Brasília (UnB)
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Miami
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-27T11:30:04Z
dc.date.available2014-05-27T11:30:04Z
dc.date.issued2013-08-01
dc.description.abstractThe ecology of forest and savanna trees species will largely determine the structure and dynamics of the forest-savanna boundaries, but little is known about the constraints to leaf trait variation imposed by selective forces and evolutionary history during the process of savanna invasion by forest species. We compared seasonal patterns in leaf traits related to leaf structure, carbon assimilation, water, and nutrient relations in 10 congeneric species pairs, each containing one savanna species and one forest species. All individuals were growing in dystrophic oxisols in a fire-protected savanna of Central Brazil. We tested the hypothesis that forest species would be more constrained by seasonal drought and nutrient-poor soils than their savanna congeners. We also hypothesized that habitat, rather than phylogeny, would explain more of the interspecific variance in leaf traits of the studied species. We found that throughout the year forest trees had higher specific leaf area (SLA) but lower integrated water use efficiency than savanna trees. Forest and savanna species maintained similar values of predawn and midday leaf water potential along the year. Lower values were measured in the dry season. However, this was achieved by a stronger regulation of stomatal conductance and of CO2 assimilation on an area basis (A area) in forest trees, particularly toward the end of the dry season. Relative to savanna trees, forest trees maintained similar (P, K, Ca, and Mg) or slightly higher (N) leaf nutrient concentrations. For the majority of traits, more variance was explained by phylogeny, than by habitat of origin, with the exception of SLA, leaf N concentration, and A area, which were apparently subjected to different selective pressures in the savanna and forest environments. In conclusion, water shortage during extended droughts would be more limiting for forest trees than nutrient-poor soils. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.en
dc.description.affiliationDepartamento de Biologia Aplicada, FCAV Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP, CEP 14884-900
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Plant Biology North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7612, Raleigh, NC, 27695-7612
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Land, Air and Water Resources University of California Davis, 3312 Plant and Environmental Sciences Bldg, Davis, CA, 95616
dc.description.affiliationDepartamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas Universidade de Brasília, Caixa Postal 04457, Brasília, DF, CEP 70904-970
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Biology, Cox Science Center University of Miami, 1301 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL, 33124
dc.description.affiliationDepartamento de Botânica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas Universidade de Brasília, Caixa postal 04457, Brasília, DF, CEP 70904-970
dc.description.affiliationUnespDepartamento de Biologia Aplicada, FCAV Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP, CEP 14884-900
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation
dc.description.sponsorshipIdNSF: DEB-0542912
dc.format.extent1139-1150
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00468-013-0864-2
dc.identifier.citationTrees - Structure and Function, v. 27, n. 4, p. 1139-1150, 2013.
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00468-013-0864-2
dc.identifier.issn0931-1890
dc.identifier.lattes0588666172501665
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84880643092
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/76105
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000321913500025
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofTrees: Structure and Function
dc.relation.ispartofjcr1.782
dc.relation.ispartofsjr0,726
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso restrito
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectCarbon isotope discrimination
dc.subjectCerrado
dc.subjectLeaf functional traits
dc.subjectLeaf nutrients
dc.subjectSpecific leaf area
dc.subjectFunctional traits
dc.subjectCarbon
dc.subjectCarbon dioxide
dc.subjectDrought
dc.subjectEcosystems
dc.subjectIsotopes
dc.subjectNutrients
dc.subjectWater supply
dc.subjectForestry
dc.subjectCarbon Dioxide
dc.subjectLeaves
dc.subjectWater Supply
dc.titleSeasonal variation in leaf traits between congeneric savanna and forest trees in Central Brazil: Implications for forest expansion into savannaen
dc.typeArtigo
dcterms.licensehttp://www.springer.com/open+access/authors+rights
unesp.author.lattes0588666172501665
unesp.campusUniversidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp), Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabalpt

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