Mortality and Recovery of Renal Function in Acute Kidney Injury Patients Treated with Prolonged Intermittent Hemodialysis Sessions Lasting 10 versus 6 Hours: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

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Purpose. This trial aimed to compare mortality and recovery of renal function in acute kidney injury (AKI) patients treated with different durations of prolonged hemodialysis (PHD) sessions (6 h versus 10 h). Methodology. We included patients with sepsis-associated AKI, >18 years, who are in use of a norepinephrine (lower than 0.7 ucg/kg/min). Results. One hundred and ninety-four patients were treated with 531 sessions of PHD (G1=104 and G2=90 patients). The two groups were similar in age and SOFA. There was no significant difference in hypotension, hypokalemia, and anticoagulation during PHD sessions. The two groups showed differences in filter clotting, hypophosphatemia, and treatment discontinuation (12.3 versus 23.1%, p=0.002; 15.5 versus 25.8%, p=0.005; and 7.9 versus 15.6%, p=0.008, respectively). There was no difference in fluid balance (FB) before and after PHD sessions. Death and complete recovery of renal function were similar (81.3 versus 82.2%, p=0.87 and 21 versus 31.2%, p=0.7, respectively). At logistic regression, the positive FB before and after dialysis was identified as risk factor for death, while volume overload after three PHD sessions and predialysis creatinine were negatively associated with recovery of renal function in 28 days. Conclusion. There was no difference in the mortality and recovery of renal function of AKI patients submitted to different durations of PHD and sessions lasting 10 h presented higher filter clotting, hypophosphatemia, and treatment discontinuation.

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International Journal of Nephrology, v. 2018.

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