Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorMoreira, Ana Paula [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorCalvi, Sueli Aparecida [UNESP]
dc.contributor.authorSoares, Ângela Maria Victoriano de Campos [UNESP]
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-27T11:22:03Z
dc.date.available2014-05-27T11:22:03Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-01
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1348-0421.2006.tb03798.x
dc.identifier.citationMicrobiology and Immunology, v. 50, n. 4, p. 307-314, 2006.
dc.identifier.issn0385-5600
dc.identifier.issn1348-0421
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11449/69268
dc.description.abstractThe mechanisms used by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb 18) to survive into monocytes are not clear. Cellular iron metabolism is of critical importance to the growth of several intracellular pathogens, including P. brasiliensis, whose capacity to multiply in mononuclear phagocytes is dependent on the availability of intracellular iron. Chloroquine, by virtue of its basic properties, has been shown to prevent release of iron from holotransferrin by raising endocytic and lysosomal pH, and thereby interfering with normal iron metabolism. Then, in view of this, we have studied the effects of CHLOR on P. brasiliensis multiplication in human monocytes and its effect on the murine paracoccidioidomycosis. CHLOR induced human monocytes to kill P. brasiliensis. The effect of CHLOR was reversed by FeNTA, an iron compound that is soluble at neutral to alkaline pH, but not by holotransferrin, which releases iron only in an acidic environment. CHLOR treatment of Pb 18-infected BALB/c mice significantly reduced the viable fungi recovery from lungs, during three different periods of evaluation, in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrates that iron is of critical importance to the survival of P. brasiliensis yeasts within human monocytes and the CHLOR treatment in vitro induces Pb 18 yeast-killing by monocytes by restricting the availability of intracellular iron. Besides, the CHLOR treatment in vivo significantly reduces the number of organisms in the lungs of Pb-infected mice protecting them from several infections. Thus, CHLOR was effective in the treatment of murine paracoccidioidomycosis, suggesting the potential use of this drug in patients' treatment.en
dc.format.extent307-314
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobiology and Immunology
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectChloroquine
dc.subjectIron
dc.subjectMonocyte
dc.subjectParacoccidioides brasiliensis
dc.subjectchloroquine
dc.subjectholotransferrin
dc.subjectiron
dc.subjectiron derivative
dc.subjecttransferrin
dc.subjectunclassified drug
dc.subjectacidity
dc.subjectalkalinity
dc.subjectanimal experiment
dc.subjectanimal model
dc.subjectanimal tissue
dc.subjectcell killing
dc.subjectcell level
dc.subjectcell survival
dc.subjectcell viability
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdose response
dc.subjectdrug effect
dc.subjectdrug efficacy
dc.subjectdrug mechanism
dc.subjectexperimental infection
dc.subjectfungicidal activity
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthuman cell
dc.subjectin vivo study
dc.subjectinfection prevention
dc.subjectintracellular membrane
dc.subjectiron kinetics
dc.subjectlung infection
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmonocyte
dc.subjectmouse
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectnormal human
dc.subjectSouth American blastomycosis
dc.subjectFungi
dc.subjectMurinae
dc.subjectMus
dc.titleChloroquine inhibits Paracoccidioides brasiliensis survival within human monocytes by limiting the availability of intracellular ironen
dc.typeArtigo
dcterms.licensehttp://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-406071.html
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology Biosciences Institute São Paulo State University, Botucatu, S.P.
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Tropical Diseases Medical School São Paulo State University, Botucatu, S.P.
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology Biosciences Institute UNESP, CEP 18618-000, Botucatu, SP
dc.description.affiliationUnespDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology Biosciences Institute São Paulo State University, Botucatu, S.P.
dc.description.affiliationUnespDepartment of Tropical Diseases Medical School São Paulo State University, Botucatu, S.P.
dc.description.affiliationUnespDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology Biosciences Institute UNESP, CEP 18618-000, Botucatu, SP
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1348-0421.2006.tb03798.x
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000236897800006
dc.rights.accessRightsAcesso restrito
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-33745116230
unesp.campusUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Instituto de Biociências, Botucatupt
unesp.campusUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Faculdade de Medicina, Botucatupt
dc.identifier.lattes2179450022699059
unesp.author.lattes2179450022699059
unesp.author.orcid0000-0003-1962-9901[4]
unesp.author.orcid0000-0001-9254-2074[1]
dc.relation.ispartofjcr1.335
dc.relation.ispartofsjr0,764
dc.relation.ispartofsjr0,764
Localize o texto completo

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record